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Friday Night Links

August 14, 2009 1 comment

Hooray! Friday is upon us. And what better way to prepare for the weekend winddown than with a batch of links and videos. Warning: Links tend to be excellent. Allow sufficient time to peruse them. Maybe go get yourself a box juice and a bag of potato chips. On to the links.

Sometimes I forget that it would be a good idea to put up some of my favorite stuff on the internet from time to time. The P.S. 22 chorus is awesome. That link leads to their blog. Here’s a video of them taking on a classic.(Lady Gaga and Coldplay at the end of this post.)

Vick signs with the Eagles. NFL Players Tweet reactions.

MSNBC blog First Read on townhalls, anger, and Republican reaction. Good stuff.

The Onion: Little Butterball Holding Up Ice Cream Line.

A Neocon for President in 2012? Daily Beast series looks at 2012 landscape. Just found this, looks bookmarkable.

Are you tired of seeing quizzes on “what childhood beach toy you are”? Is the craziest you get on facebook entail sending out an inquiring wall post? Or maybe a poke if you’re feeling saucy? Well then Facebook Lite might be for you.

Clearly the best part is at the end when he nonchalantly says, “When I interviewed Vice President Joe Biden, he became my homeboy. Now that I’ve interview you would you like to be my homeboy?”

Madden 2010. May need to dip back into the classic franchise…

Interesting post from Slate’s Brow Beat Blog.

Oooo top 100 blogs. Where the blogosphere and twitterosphere meet apparently.

What’s coming up in New York City?

This guy wrote about a traffic problem in Queens for the Queens Ledger. This guy is me.(I know about the typo, don’t know what happened there)

Magazine Launch parties are back! Regular readers may fondly remember my post on another magazine launch party from ten years ago.

P.S. 22 Chorus sings Lady Gaga’s Just Dance with(thankfully) cleaned up lyrics:

And the kids sing a song rumored to be about the Crusades, the French Revolution, Napoleon, George W. Bush, Caesar, Nero, or Jesus Christ:

Back to the Future: Augmented Reality Twitter

Marty McFly would have blown his flux capacitor if he read the post below.

Marty McFly would have blown his flux capacitor if he read the post below.

As the Joker famously said in The Dark Knight, “And… here… we… go!”

What is augmented reality twitter? The best thing ever according to some, and to others it will be yet more evidence of the impending downfall of our civilization. My take? The technology could actually have some life-saving real world applications. Check the video and read on.

So at this point you think I lost it. You’re thinking, “Adrian, there are floating faces sending tweets using GPS technology. Please tell me you’re kidding with the life-saving thing.” Well, actually I’m not. See, Twitter has already shown it’s unparalleled ability to provide up to the second updates in dangerous circumstances. The Iran election fallout was a high profile one, the recent plane collision over the Hudson River was another.

Imagine this scenario. There is a school shooting on a sprawling college campus. The day was well-planned and the tragedy has law enforcement playing catchup. On a campus this big and with the shooters separated in different buildings, a dangerous stalemate is taking place. No one knows where the survivors are hiding but its a race against time. The students could make a call from where they’re hiding but they risk being heard. A tweet will help. A GPS aided augmented reality tweet would really do the trick.

In this scenario a still disbelieving officer scans  an iPhone across three large buildings and he can see where students are hiding. Law enforcement concentrates their efforts efficiently and saves students. Imagine a terrorist attack. Imagine finding survivors beneath rubble before time runs out. It sounds crazy. But it could be a reality.

It will probably end up being primarily used by a teenager to find her friends in the mall. But it could be great. Apple has to open up its code so that this technology can become widespread first though because as of now it was done as a work around. Stay tuned. It might be as close as we get to time travelling cars.

Friday Night Links: Twitter Edition

What? A graphic?! Yes, its that time of the week. This time a wrinkle. All of the links will come from my interesting tweets(and retweets) of the week. Don’t worry they’re not all about Twitter. Its a vibrant cross section of the news that is the fabric of this great nation. Oh and videos. I always bring the vids.

Jon Stewart earns the wrath of Rush Limbaugh. Looks like a win-win for Stewart.

The GOP isn’t worried about backlash from hispanics over Sotomayor. I think they should be.

Grad sues college for tuition because she can’t get a job.

Newly discovered pieces by Mozart, technically demanding and furiously paced. He was seven or eight years old when he wrote them. When I was seven, my teacher asked the class to find out the opposite of the word “sweet”. I came back the next day, told her it was “sour” and received some sort of prize. My accomplishment was not technically demanding, furiously paced nor was it an extensive concerto movement.

Cheesily produced video of the greatest basketball team ever assembled. The 1992 Dream Team:

The prevalence of these stories doesn’t make it any less alarming. We’re running out of oil at an unbelievable rate.

Apple tries to silence 11 year old with exploding iPod.

I’ve said it once and I’ll say it again. The time for lasers on top of airplanes has come.

The Onion: “Victim of Mall Shooting Determined Not To Die In Yankee Candle”

140 characters? Please. Old news. The cheapest telegrams used to be 150 characters. Includes awesome code words for shortening sentences. Thus: “If a sufficient inducement is offered, the hunting expedition will not set out” could be sent in code by simply sending “Inert hurst” in a telegram.

With the news that championship hero David Ortiz failed a steroid test in 2003, coming on the heels of the Patriots shady business during Spygate, a new song has come out. Boston Trophy Party:

Reuters CEO is going at online content distribution just like the AP…but the exact opposite. “I believe in the link economy.” Great read.

Hey so, why are Russian nuclear submarines snooping off the East coast of the US?

The Onion: Solitary Crow on Fence Post Portending Doom, Analysts Warn

Candidate Bloomberg: Let’s reopen LIRR stations in Elmhurst, Richmond Hill, and Glendale. Please do Mr. Mayor if you are reelected to be mayor once again. Transportation in some parts of Queens is a nightmare.

Seth Rogan talks about being rejected by Megan Fox with rejection clip. Hilarious.

Geez, why was he so nervous anyway?

Oh.

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For a chance to have my blog posts delivered to the comfort of a popular social network, follow me @TheRealAdrianC on Twitter, where I retweet  loads of interesting and important stories each day, send out social media news, and of course, pass along my humble blog posts, to you, the discerning new media devotee.

Risky Business: News Corp. To Charge For Online Content

The Last Mogul will either be the first innovator or...the last mogul.

The "Last Mogul" will either be the first innovator or...the last mogul.

It happens in many of our favorite action movies. The hero has been outsmarted. He’s up against the wall and the pirate/ninja/dragon/girlfriend has the upper hand. The hero is out of options. Will we see him fall? Assuredly so…unless …unless of course he can pull off the riskiest of moves. He has no other options but to swing on a rope onto another ship/use a forbidden martial arts move that could leave him defenseless or deal a fatal blow/roll underneath the beast, avoid napalm-like flame and plunge his sword deep into its belly/feign sickness to get out of the scrabble triple date. This is the news industry. It’s zero hour. And it’s their move.

And so it is amidst these dire circumstances that Rupert Murdoch decided that his success with the Wall Street Journal is enough to test the waters of monetizing online news across all of his newspapers by June 2010. The New York Post, the UK’s Times and the Sun, and Australia’s Daily Telegraph are just some of the newspapers he owns besides the WSJ.

As I blogged about a couple of weeks ago some companies are trying to get ahead of this coming wave of news organizations trying to figure out how to receive revenue for quality journalism. The trick is that they must provide a price point or a pay model that retains enough readers so that advertisers don’t jump ship. Whether news organizations use an intermediary or develop their own system, it’s clear that they will have to create a delicate balance between opposing forces.

If Murdoch succeeds? Besides inflating his ego, it will save newspapers. Plain and simple. In an era where classified advertising went to Craigslist, newspapers would receive a life preserver in the form of revenue injection across the board. If it fails? News Corp. will stumble badly but I don’t think it can get much worse for other news organizations. The worst of the recession has passed by most accounts and newspapers are hurting, but they are surviving.

So the movie will play out in front of our eyes. The trouble–of course–is that at the end of movies you leave the theater happy. In real life? The good guys don’t always win.

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For a chance to have my blog posts delivered to the comfort of a popular social network, follow me @TheRealAdrianC on Twitter, where I retweet  loads of interesting and important stories each day, send out social media news, and of course, pass along my humble blog posts, to you, the discerning new  media devotee.

Drunk on ‘Sexcess’: What A Lavish 1999 Magazine Launch Party Has To Do With A 2009 Recession.

Ten years ago Talk Magazine was the you know what of the town.

Ten years ago Talk Magazine was the 'you know what' of the town.

Bill Simmons, popular national columnist from ESPN, has taken a liking to Twitter. As such he posts early and often @sportsguy33. One of his recent tweets was about the startling difference between the much ballyhooed launch of Talk Magazine in 1999 and the stark reality that confronts the industry now. The story is a great read, chronicling the absolutely over the top nature of a party in front of the Statue of Liberty, complete with floor pillows and celebrities bumping into each other in a shrouded outdoor atmosphere. A quote from the story:

“Ten years ago, journalists, long the salarymen of the publishing economy, began gorging on big contracts and options from digital start-ups like shrimp at a free buffet. With coveted writers commanding $5 for every typed word into magazines that were stuffed to the brim with advertising, there was a fizziness, some would say recklessness, in the air. The industry was drunk on its own prerogatives, working a party that seemed as if it would never end.”

Does that sound familiar? While I was reading it, suddenly my mind was shifting away from the mistakes of magazines and I felt like this wasn’t about the writers and publishers at all. The paragraph above could just as easily be describing the culture on Wall Street. Is it passe to bash these companies? I don’t think so. Especially because they continue to operate in a reality other than the one most of us inhabit. In 2008, 4793 Wall Streeters made over $1 million in bonuses. They received taxpayer money and doled it out liberally. But surely those practices have mercifully ended, correct? These companies, ones that received TARP payouts, they’re not back to their old ways are they? Well actually they are, as Goldman Sachs prepares to hand out $11.4 billion this year to its employees. I don’t know enough about this topic to say for certain that companies like Goldman should be exercising restraint for the good of their company. What I can say is that I’m pretty sure  it looks terrible for them to be tossing money from the rafters while the rest of the country suffers through the worst recession and job market in a generation. But what I can’t say authoritatively, I will let others do.

The New York Times: “Goldman, analysts warned, is embracing financial risks that many of its competitors are unable or unwilling to take. While Goldman managed those risks this time, its strategy could backfire if the markets turn against it.”

Moneyweek: “Trading in fixed income, currency and commodities generated half Goldman’s record revenues. That can’t last. Competitors will return and clients will lose enthusiasm for trading as the rally runs out of steam. And as investors lose their appetite for government debt, Goldman will also struggle to continue earning fees by finding buyers for this.”

New York Daily News: “The scary thing is we’re about to see the cycle repeat itself – and it will lead to near insolvency at another firm too big to fail,” said John Coffee, a Columbia law professor. “High-risk, high return trading – where managers share in the upside, but not in the downside – has already returned to Goldman Sachs, and other banks will say they have to do the same thing so they can compete with Goldman.”

Well! That sounds fantastic. Let me see if I get this straight. It’s hard to get your mind around complex issues when you’re not gifted with the intelligence and foresight of financial tycoons, executives, and CEO’s, so bear with me. With Wall Street drunk on a mix of success and excess, let’s call it ‘sexcess’, our financial system was on the brink of failure. It was saved by the government. The government still owns some of these companies, like one-third of Citigroup, for example. So last year amidst the meltdown, these corporations continued to shell out big bonuses. Now this year, despite everything that happened, a little success, in one quarter mind you, has led companies to throw caution to the wind once again. “Screw it! We’re back,” seems to be the sentiment. And on top of this fortunate news, analysts believe that other companies will feel that they need to embrace the risky practices that led to near catastrophy and threatened our fair republic.

The amount that Americans should be outraged is incalculable. Maybe, David A. Viniar, Chief Financial Officer for Goldman Sachs can take us away with a comforting quote. Something to make us all sleep a little better tonight.

Viniar on bonuses, from NYT: “We pay for performance.”

I bet the publisher of Talk Magazine was thinking the same thing in the shadow of the Statue of Liberty, on a night not so long ago.


For a chance to have my blog posts delivered to the comfort of a popular social network, follow me @TheRealAdrianC on Twitter, where I retweet  loads of interesting and important stories each day, send out social media news, and of course, pass along my humble blog posts, to you, the discerning new media devotee.

Friday Night Links

We continue the wildly popular and catchy weekly feature that is not necessarily posted at night. This week I saved a bunch of links throughout the week in preparation for this momentous post. Onto the links.

Mayor Bloomberg to homeless: We’ll pay for a one-way ticket to ship you out of NYC.

The Onion is “bought” by chinese businessmen. In classic Onion fashion, the headline: Why Did No One Inform Us Of The Imminent Death Of The American Newspaper Industry?

Wall Street Journal had eight unemployed people blog about their experience looking for jobs. Many are working now. But at a cost.

The Journalist’s Guide to Twitter.

This video is hilarious to me because I know many people who are/have been addicted to World of Warcraft:

You know I love LOST so I don’t want to hear any lip. “Ben”, “Hurley” and the ever eye-lined “Richard” discuss the end of the show and the Jack, Kate and Sawyer love triangle.(Video)

Scientists Worry Machines May Outsmart Man. This article has really cool, if slightly unnerving buzzwords like the rapture, the end of the human era, and the singularity,

Did Obama ever really believe in bipartisanship? And what does the term mean anyway?

The Audacity of Hops: Beer summit stats. Bud Light for Obama, Blue Moon for Sergeant James Crowley, Sam Adams Light for Harvard Scholar Henry Louis Gates, and a Buckler nonalcoholic beer for Vice President Joe Biden. Biden must have been designated driver.

Second Avenue Subway! Delayed Again.

This is the first thing I thought of when I heard the news. Well played MTA!

This is the first thing I thought of when I heard the news. Well played MTA!

Amid seemingly yearly fare hikes, the MTA has not made friends with transit riders. Now comes news of a delay that  is infuriating for many, but expected by most. I wonder if the MTA will release a follow up ad to the above image:

“Put your head down.

Starting in 2017, the project that has been rumored for an entire generation will finally shuttle weary and beleaguered New Yorkers to relieve overcrowding on the Lexington line. Maddening but hypothetical news.

P.S. The above might not actually happen. We reserve the right to make it 2021, 2023 or sometime after. Oh, and the fare will be $6.00 by then. But look out for the two fares for $11.50 deal. Its gonna be a steal.”

I’ve always heard about how business owners on second avenue have been suffering because customers stay away from eyesore construction and have no place to park. After, I heard about this I did a little bit of reading on the mythological subway line.

This baby would be amazing and relieve a lot of stress for New Yorkers who have to pack into the 4,5,6 line.

This baby would be amazing and relieve a lot of stress for New Yorkers who have to pack into the 4,5,6 line.

The line would bring tourism to a different part of New York City, send real estate prices skyrocketing, and undoubtedly pay for itself many times over. But that seems like a pipe dream at this point. I particularly enjoyed when the MTA said it was looking like 2016 was the date for completion of Phase I, but then the Federal Transit Authority said it looks like 2017 and most likely 2018.

How ridiculous is this? Isn’t this counterintuitive in real life? We all know the person who always errs on the optimistic side but never comes through. “Yeah I’ll be there at 7pm!” But then 8:30 rolls around, and you’re stressed out and three drinks in at the bar. Why not just give an accurate time? Isn’t a little stress beforehand better than five times as much afterwards? Why wouldn’t the MTA gather some reporters and say, “Yeah, listen we messed up. We’re gonna tell you 2020 but you can write whatever date you want. A fictional date is worth nothing to New Yorkers. We’re going to work hard to get it done and maybe we’ll surprise you for once.”

That would be overdue but excellent news.