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Posts Tagged ‘Mashable’

Newsgasm:On Clinton/North Korea, Clunkers, LA Fitness Shooting and more…

I’m going to try something a little different here. I had a little bit to say about multiple news stories, nothing I wanted to ramble about. Maybe this becomes a weekly feature maybe not, but can you say recurring? I think so.

Bill Clinton/North Korea: It’s amazing that the United States was able to pull this off with a huge assist from Bill Clinton. But as information came out yesterday that Clinton already had a guarantee that he was going to be taking the prisoners home, I wasn’t surprised. Howard Kurtz, Washington Post media critic, opined that this was the case on @HowardKurtz on Twitter, before it became public. What I find most interesting is that North Korea rejected Al Gore and seemingly Hillary Clinton as emissaries, and asked for Bill Clinton.

Cash for ‘Clunkers’: Click for data on why the program is working. I, like so many others in this country am tired of the political games that seem necessary to achieve progress in this country. It doesn’t matter what your politics are. Let me repeat, this is not about politics. The program set out to improve the average mileage of cars in the United States, have  positive environmental and economic repercussions because of it,  and help Americans who were three of four thousand dollars short of being able to finally get a new car. Guess what. It’s a success. Getting the extra $2 billion should not necessitate arm wringing and nonsensical posturing. This time it was Republicans but neither party is immune to the idiocy that is common place. When progress can only be accomplished at a glacial pace, Americans lose out in the long run.

LA Fitness Shooting: Click for story from CNN. This tragic story may have a lasting impact on law enforcement. Mashable details online diary entries from the  murderer who set out to kill young women. He was planning it and talked about  how he was lonely, hadn’t had a girlfriend since 1984 and that he didn’t want to live anymore. How will law enforcement patrol the internet for dangerous people who are making their criminal intentions known beforehand?

Healthcare: The article explains that Democrats are feeling good about passing healthcare reform after a pep talk from the Head Coach-in-Chief. I know that healthcare is a polarizing issue and even within a party, there is disagreement. I even blogged about an issue that’s been dismissed that may be crucial in the debate. But why exactly are Republicans so up in arms? So astonished, bewildered and enraged about the prospect of healthcare? This was one of the pillars of Obama’s campaign. He won. Did you think he would decide against it once he was able to kick his feet up in the Oval office? I don’t mean to trivialize the issue. But last week Nancy Pelosi said that Democrats have the votes to pass healthcare. Politicians are the cagiest of people, why would she say this and have it blow up in her face? It seems that the Democrats can push something through if they want because of the public signing off on it in the election and because they can get the votes. Disagreement within the party has slowed progress of the bill because Blue Dog(more conservative) Democrats want consessions in the bill that progressives are against. Its pretty clear that Republicans will not work with Democrats for the best possible bill. It goes against their principles to do so. But why the uproar? If its so bad for the country won’t people realize this? If the bill is just another collosal mistake by the Obama administration, won’t this make it easier for a Republican challenger to harness the momentum of public opinion and defeat Obama in the 2012 election?

ESPN To Employees: Stop Tweeting You Twerps!

In the last 36 hours, the US Marines have banned Twitter use, the NFL has banned Twitter, and now comes news that ESPN will only let employees Tweet if, you know, it’s not about sports. What’s next? Shaq can’t tweet about random acts of Shaqness? CNN can’t tweet about news? I can’t tweet about blog posts and blog about tweets? What is the world coming to?

Ive said it before and Ill say it again. I want to know about an NBA reporters vacation and car shopping experiences.

I've said it before and I'll say it again. I want to know about an NBA reporter's vacation destinations and car shopping experiences.

In all seriousness, ESPN could not be more shortsighted in it’s gagging of employees and in it’s approach to Twitter. Let’s look at the internal memo which they thankfully(foolishly?) released. Via Deadspin:

Specific Guidelines
· Personal websites and blogs that contain sports content are not permitted
· Prior to engaging in any form of social networking dealing with sports, you must receive permission from the supervisor as appointed by your department head
· ESPN.COM may choose to post sports related social media content
· If ESPN.com opts not to post sports related social media content created by ESPN talent, you are not permitted to report, speculate, discuss or give any opinions on sports related topics or personalities on your personal platforms
· The first and only priority is to serve ESPN sanctioned efforts, including sports news, information and content
Assume at all times you are representing ESPN
If you wouldn’t say it on the air or write it in your column, don’t tweet it
Exercise discretion, thoughtfulness and respect for your colleagues, business associates and our fans
· Avoid discussing internal policies or detailing how a story or feature was reported, written, edited or produced and discussing stories or features in progress, those that haven’t been posted or produced, interviews you’ve conducted, or any future coverage plans.
· Steer clear of engaging in dialogue that defends your work against those who challenge it and do not engage in media criticism or disparage colleagues or competitors
· Be mindful that all posted content is subject to review in accordance with ESPN’s employee policies and editorial guidelines
· Confidential or proprietary company information or similar information of third parties who have shared such information with ESPN, should not be shared
Any violation of these guidelines could result in a range of consequences, including but not limited to suspension or dismissal.”

“Prior to engaging in any form of social networking dealing with sports, you must receive permission from the supervisor as appointed by your department head.” Twitter and social media helps to pass content along and inform viewers of upcoming programming. This is free advertising! That fans want to read! Bill Simmons constantly pimps ESPN’s fantastic upcoming documentary series ’30 for 30′. Is this a bad thing for ESPN?

” The first and only priority is to serve ESPN sanctioned efforts, including sports news, information and content.” My favorite one. On ESPN besides the oft-mentioned Simmons, (who is going to have the biggest name on my tag cloud soon) Marc Stein and Ric Bucher tweet about in progress reporting before a story is ready for submission. While this might sound a little dangerous, they use their news judgment as experienced professionals, to decide what little nugget would be simultaneously interesting to readers and harmless to divulge. Why does ESPN insist on treating their employees like irresponsible children?

“Assume at all times you are representing ESPN. If you wouldn’t say it on the air or write it in your column, don’t tweet it” More of the same. ESPN has a history of taking itself too seriously. On a March 27th B.S. Report podcast with his boss John A. Walsh, Simmons shared five gripes about ESPN and the first one was that ESPN could have a better sense of humor about itself. Walsh agreed. but he didn’t reallyaddress the concerns. This is an example of outdated thinking and is exemplified in their approach to employee tweets. Twitter has many different applications, especially for a giant media company, and its shocking that they wouldn’t want to embrace this.

Social media connoisseur, Chris Brogan put it this way:

“You can use your robot feeds to blurt out posts and showtimes and stuff, but if you want connectivity to people, engagement to your content, and a sense of participation on the social web, making people only talk about ESPN is a quick one-way ticket to “who cares?”

Over at Deadspin the writer chronicled how ESPN employees were scared to send over the memo and believed that Bucher was “flagrantly testing” the new policy. Simmons tweeted “My take on the great unspoken: Ultimately it’s good if (redacted) incorporates (redacted). Had to start somewhere. I trust @rfking(ESPN.com editor-in-chief). So there.”

Too bad we’ll never know if that’s what he really thinks.
UPDATE: I don’t think my post is what did it but…ESPN responds to backlash and criticism.

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For a chance to have my blog posts delivered to the comfort of a popular social network, follow me @TheRealAdrianC on Twitter, where I retweet  loads of interesting and important stories each day, send out social media news, and of course, pass along my humble blog posts, to you, the discerning new media devotee.

The Associated Press vs. The Internet

The Associated Press would charge 12.50 for a quote of five words.

The Associated Press would charge 12.50 for a quote of five words.

You know, I get it. Journalism is in trouble. Oh yes, its true. Business model is in shambles and no one quite knows how you monetize something that people have been getting for free, for years now. There are ten-year olds, who only know a world with nothing but free, high quality journalism. So everyone is kind of in a free-for-all attempting to salvage a virtuous and important industry.

Some are now toying with the idea of different pay models for news sites, as I blogged about a couple of weeks ago. The Associated Press has decided to go the extra mile. If you want to quote five words or more, it will cost you $2.50 a word. The AP is upset because they feel that their content is hijacked all around the internet. I won’t dispute that, I’m sure they track their content well and know that they don’t like the current setup. But as this story over at Mashable says, it’s a  news wire. Don’t they want to encourage sharing of their stories? Shouldn’t they figure out a way to work within the current rules a little better? I think this experiment is an example of a news organization striking out big time. I hope I’m wrong, but just to be safe, let me quote four words from one of their stories so I don’t have to break out some greenbacks. “This Makes No Sense,” Associated Press.

For a chance to have my blog posts delivered to the comfort of a popular social network, follow me @TheRealAdrianC on Twitter, where I retweet  loads of interesting and important stories each day, send out social media news, and of course, pass along my humble blog posts, to you, the discerning new media devotee.

Of Facebook and Tweeting

Facebook is a fan favorite while Twitter has yet to grow on some.

Facebook is a fan favorite while Twitter has yet to grow on some.

Social networks get a bad rap. Sure, many people use Facebook to stalk a hottie they’re smitten with, waste time chatting with friends, or take a four question quiz which magically deciphers which household appliance they are. And sure Twitter can be 140 characters of status messages about how you  “just jumped rope” or “walked to the store and bought gum but not cinnamon flavored because I hate that flavor”. A large swath of Twitter users even make one Tweet and never return(@PaulBongo, I’m looking at you). I gave a lot of negatives there. But here’s the thing.

Despite the negative attention social networks get, or the dismissive air of many nonusers, eventually people come around to the popular ones. Myspace was this way and then eventually people were jostling for top friends recognition. Facebook was this way and then all of a sudden adults and mothers and fathers were getting them(much to the chagrin of their children). But Twitter isn’t this way. Twitter has some fierce holdouts unseen in the social network era.(Who knows with athletes tweeting from the bench during games the steroid era might actually be followed by the social network era.) I know many people who’s attitude towards Twitter borders on vitriolic. People who’s principled stances against even one solitary tweet seem ready to pass the test of time. And its only because people don’t understand the applications for Twitter or how to tweet.

*A Guy Explains Twitter to His 85 year old mother with Transcript. Excellent.

I’ve been doing some tweesearch recently and I’ve come across some interesting things. See, new Twitter trends are constantly changing, the possible uses of Twitter are still evolving. One story from Mashable looked at the top five Twitter trends last month. Real-time search is what Twitter provides that Google can not. When the uprising in Iran become a global news story, the #IranElection tag was(and still is) an up to the second way of knowing what was happening in the country and what people were saying about the issue.

A breaking story by the second. Click for an excellent piece on Iran and Twitter by Time.

A breaking story by the second. Click for an excellent piece on Iran and Twitter by Time.

I won’t go through every trend but this month’s article showcases live video sharing and Twitter petitions as new and interesting trends. Live videos could be used by someone with a certain expertise who is holding a question and answer session. It could be used for interviews or to promote content and creativity. Twitter petition’s could give a measure of power back to the consumer. After AT&T customers and iPhone users circulated a “Twitition” about unfair iPhone upgrade deals, AT&T decided to lower their prices. Journalists also use Twitter in interesting ways but I’ll cover that in another post some time.

I used a lot of content from Mashable and its in their best interest if more and more people use social networking sites and their content gets more viewers but the point remains that Twitter has a certain level of utility. If its not for you that’s fine. But it’s for more than just tweeting, “Boy, does Adrian love Twitter.”